Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Finding Daisy : West Highland White, Continued

 "Finding Daisy"

An unfinished painting has a voice. It continually calls to you until it is heard when you listen to make the final touches and complete it. Until the painting is finished the voice will not be silenced. Nor will the restlessness in a true artists soul.

This morning I headed for my studio to work on my new book. I have a fabulous new chapter to work on that is really thrilling me. And yet I couldn't ignore the call to finish my painting of Daisy, the West Highland White terrier that I shared on my blog yesterday. Bearing in mind that this painting is merely a study to work from in a later larger creation, it is now looking so intriguing that I am wanting to show Daisy's owner. I hadn't wished to until I painted the real thing. There is a feeling of connection between myself, the little dog and the moment I watched her play in my garden in this study. A connection that may be lost in the real painting, because as time passes my emotions will soften and change as I work on new paintings instead. Paintings that lead me further away from Daisy.

I have now strengthened the detail on the face of my terrier study. You can see I did indeed make the decision not to add the tongue showing. The inquisitive expression of the face seemed more interesting with the mouth closed. I have also hinted at one paw being raised which to me looks cute and hints at action about to happen . As if Daisy could indeed dart away at any second, as she did on the day in real life.

I like the last stage seen below as well. The white of the rear coat worked well so I may go back to this idea for my full large painting.


 Yesterdays closing stage of my study of Daisy.

It is hard to imagine that below is the starting stage, or was, of this little painting. Just a few colour marks for an outline, hints of eyes and a nose and the suggestion of what my subject could be is there. Minus any of the later work involved in the study at the top of this blog post. The whole point of a study exercise is to learn. To learn about form, colour combinations and ideas that may bring a subject to life in a way that is pleasing. Each brushstroke leads me further into loving painting this breed of dog that I love so much.

 Perhaps Daisy needs a soul mate in my next painting with a new model! We will see. 
But for now, I am "Finding Daisy" in watercolour


How my study of Daisy originally started before it grew to the above painting.

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Artists Tips for the day

1) Learn to "listen" to what a painting tells you it needs
2) Take a break from a painting overnight, so you can look at it with fresh eyes the next morning to see what it needs.
3) Listen to your heart when it tells you to paint!


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1 comment:

BarberryLane Designs said...

I so enjoy watching your process. And thank you for so generously sharing, not just the paintings but the 'why' of the process. Can't wait to get outside and paint, if we ever get some decent weather here, Sandi